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We specialize

In Healthy, Socialized puppies that are in multiple colours and patterns such as:

Solids, Phantom, Tuxedo, Brindle, Sable,& Parti Poodles!

We are striving to produce low COI , and the best quality Standard Poodles!

Please fill out ~ Puppy Application PRESS SUBMIT AFTER

 

He is stunning with an amazing personality and is looking for a forever home

 

 

OUR SPRING LITTERS ARE HERE!

 

 

Bella and Rhett
Puppies born March 8 th 2017

BOYS ARE LEFT IN THIS LITTER

MORE LITTERS BELOW!

 

 

Stella and Tux

 

 

STELLA AND OUR BOY TUX

Has 9 SPRING PUPPIES!

Puppies born March 30th 2017

Boys and Girls

 

Litter Now Here!

8 Phantoms!

We have a Brown /Apricot boy Available and B;lk /red Tri Boy and Two Phantom Girls!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here are some of their last siblings

PIPPA------- and----------- Sadie ALSO PIPPA LOUNGING!

Above and below same puppies!

 

GEORGIE AND RHETT

SOME OF THEIR PAST LITTER PUPS ARE BELOW

 

BACCHUS AND MOCHA

ABOVE SIBLINGS

 

 

VITA

HAS BEEN A CHOOSEN STUD FOR MANY POODLE BREEDERS.

THERE FORE WE WILL HAVE A FEW PICKS FROM LITTERS, BOTH FROM RED/APRICOT DAM'S.

EXPECTED LATE JANUARY 2017

 View My You Tube Video's

 

THE WHELPING PEN BELOW IS WHERE ALL THE PUPPIES ARE RAISED !

We take great pride and care in breeding and raising our puppies.

All puppies are sold Registered
First set of shots
Dew claw & Tails left NATURAL
Health certificate
Micro chipped
Copy of Pedigree
Also a life time of breeder support
Six week free Pet Secure insurance

We train puppies to ring hanging bells not just a doggy door, we do not have kennels.

They are inside and play out side if weather permitted.

We suggest crate training once they are in your home . -

I highly recommend getting this book by: Pat Hastings called, "Puppy development"

I do provide when available!

WE STRONLY BELIEVE IN" NOT" FIXING A FEMALE PUPPY TILL THE EARLIEST OF 8/10 MONTHS OLD AND MALES AFTER A YEAR. ALL OUR GUARENTEES ARE VOID IF ANYONE FIXES THEIR PUPPY EARLIER THAN THIS.. PLEASE WATCH THE VIDEO ON( YOU TUBE) BY DR. BECKER CALLED- WATCH THIS BEFORE YOU SPAY YOUR DOG!

THIS VIDEO IS ALSO ON MY LINKS PAGE! ALSO WE ARE FIRM BELIEVERS IN NOT DESEXING DOGS JUST HAVE TUBES TIED TO PREVENT MANY ISSUES!

WE ALSO FOLLOW DR.DODDS IN ALL OUR VACCINES, AND LESS IS BEST.

FOOD LINKED BELOW, WHAT WE FEED OUR PUPPIES !

THIS CAN BE ORDERED BY CLICKING ON LINK .

THANK YOU!

FREE DELIVERY

>> This puppy is also offered an extra year guarantee, if puppy is place on TLC and remains on this food, the warranty will be extended to three years. This is because the breeder believes that a healthy wholesome diet leads to overall good health of the dog, and in the long run there are far less health issues. The breeder believes in TLC, as it is a wholesome food and manufactured locally, with strict quality controls, and that this is the choice of food for her puppies!

Order on line using coupon code 23092-1025 or call tool free 877-328- 8400

Nutrition page

Puppy Suggestions

Sales Agreement

 

Coconut Oil in Your Pet's Diet

 

 

OUR STUD TUX, IS A TUXEDO MARKED STANDARD POODLE

WITH THREE REGISTRATIONS, CKC/ AKC/UKC


A true Tuxedo Poodle will have very special markings in certain areas that literally remind you of a tuxedo

There will be: A white bib - this is color on the chest, it may or may not wrap all the way around the dog's neck
A white belly - This "should" touch the bib, making a continuous white area
White that extends from the belly down to the front and hind legs and paws.

While this is the preferred look of a Tuxedo Poodle, some will only have white that extends down the front legs, some will have a disconnection of the bib to belly, others may have white markings on the head, etc. While slight spotting on the white hairs is acceptable, heavy spotting (known as ticking) is not preferred. The photo above shows a "perfect" Tuxedo Poodle, the white is extremely pure and crisp and covers all above mentioned areas in a clear, defined way.

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Puppy Check

You may think the biggest problem you'll have with a new puppy is being too overwhelmed with all that cuteness to appropriately correct bad behavior. In a way, yes, that is your biggest challenge. You have to get past all the fluffy, floppy, big-eyed, clumsy cuteness to create and enforce rules and training that create a happy, balanced dog once all that puppy cuteness fades away.Once puppy hits the "teenage" stage around 9-12 months, trouble begins if the owners didn't really buy into how much attention, exercise, training and patience a puppy would require - especially as that ball of fluff quickly grows into a dog with the size and intelligence and creativity of a Standard Poodle! It’s up to you to set the correct foundation from the time puppy comes home with you so the transition from puppyhood to fabulous adult companion will go as smoothly as possible. Below are the areas requiring particular attention and strategies. The intent is to give you a basic understanding of what you need to consider - and plan for in advance - in order to raise a healthy, happy puppy and maintain your sanity (at least most of the time) in the process:


Socialization and Basic Training


Basic commands and leash training can (and should) begin the moment you bring your puppy home. Nipping, barking, basics for sit, stay, lie down and recall, reigning in the prey drive, getting enough exercise, learning to interact appropriately with other dogs including reading and responding to social cues and not getting into fights or being reactive ... you get the idea. There's a long, long list of things that puppy owners need to tackle to help puppy develop into a great companion. That's why one of the first and most important things to do, once vaccinations are accomplished, is to sign up for a puppy socialization class. Not only will your puppy have a chance to interact with other young dogs in a supervised setting — making sure that no one gets bullied and shy dogs can build up their confidence — but also you as the owner will learn a lot about reading dog body language so you can understand and predict what's going on in the play group. You'll be able to "hear" what your puppy is telling you all by how he moves around. You'll also learn what play cues look like versus bullying behavior, and how to help guide your puppy through social situations. Ultimately, a puppy socialization class sets up both of you for success when you're out in public. And hen you take the role of responsible dog owner to heart, by the end of puppy socialization classes you'll be ready and excited to move into basic obedience classes. It's in these classes that you'll learn all sorts of things like using positive reinforcement to get your dog to perform basic commands like sit, stay, and come. These, along with commands like leave it, drop it, stand and stay, lie down can be life saving. If you want your dog to be a great companion, then be prepared to spend at least as much time training yourself as you will spend on socializing and training your puppy.


Vaccinations, Boosters, Vet Bills

Puppies need a lot of care in their first months of life, so plan on a few trips to the vet.Puppies leave our home after their first puppy shot and worming. They will require two more puppy shots followed by a rabies vaccination [following Dr. Jean Dodds’ protocol] several weeks after puppy shot #3. The basic immunizations cover diseases like distemper, parvovirus and rabies, but there are a lot of other issues that puppies can have, including worms, hernias (which sometimes need surgery to fix), retained baby teeth, and other issues. In short, if you're taking on a puppy, be prepared to give the time and money it takes to make frequent trips to the vet during the puppy's first several months of life. It's a great idea to also get puppy insurance. You pay a small monthly fee so that if anything big happens — like the puppy breaks a leg, swallows something, or (heaven forbid) gets attacked at the dog park — you don't get hit with the giant vet bill. There are several pet insurance companies to choose from and with a little research or a recommendation from your vet, you can sign up and be covered for those just-in-case moments.

Housebreaking and Crate Training

Housebreaking and crate training are two of the most important things you can teach your dog, and they both take patience. Everyone wants a dog who is housebroken, so potty training is a top priority. Depending on the dog, housebreaking can be relatively easy, or it may take months of diligent effort, patience, and plenty of carpet spot remover. Puppies seem to regress with each growth spurt, adding an additional challenge. Figuring out a strategy that works for your dog, having the time and energy to take frequent breaks, and enforcing the rules will all be part of successfully housebreaking your puppy. Along with housebreaking comes crate training. Having a quiet place for a dog to go when the household is busy and it's not safe to have a puppy underfoot, or when the puppy just needs a break, or whenever people will be gone is vital to keeping everyone's sanity — the puppy's included! Crate training is all about providing a relaxing, secure, comforting place for a dog to be. It keeps the pup out of trouble, helps ease or even cure separation anxiety, and gives humans space when they need it. But crate training is tough work. A long-term strategy and consistency are both musts.

Exercise

Ensuring your puppy gets lots of exercise is imperative, and a great way to avoid destructive behavior. A good puppy is a tired puppy! Gnawing, digging, shredding, scratching ... puppies create havoc everywhere they go with their boundless energy, curiosity, and their desire to test the durability and edibility of practically everything in their environment. One of the biggest frustrations new puppy owners should be ready for is not knowing what clothing, furniture, plants and other household items are going to last through the first months or year of having a new puppy. This is perhaps where your patience will be tested the most. There are ways to avoid the majority of destruction, and this includes giving your puppy PLENTY of exercise and a structured, consistent environment for training. Having hardly any energy left to wreak havoc as well as clearly knowing what the household rules are (including, perhaps, only being allowed in certain rooms or having certain toys to play with) gives puppy little need or desire to eat a slipper or tear into the laundry basket. It is a proven fact that exercising puppy’s mind is often more physically tiring than a walk or romp. When puppy exhibits boundless energy, work with him on sits, downs, whatever skills you’ve taught him. Yet another reason to get him enrolled in obedience classes!

Separation Anxiety and Developmental Fear Phases


Puppies go through periods when they're more fearful than usual, often when they have experienced a growth spurt, and some puppies are more affected than others. Recognizing and helping them through these times is critical. Having a dog who is comfortable being alone and isn't dependent on you is a great thing. You may like the idea of being needed, and it may feel impossible to ignore the whimpers and cries of a puppy learning to be alone, but your dog is more mentally stable when he knows how to be alone for a few hours at a time and doesn't panic when you leave the house or even go into another room. Putting in the work to know what separation anxiety is, recognizing the degree to which your puppy has it (most dogs have it to some degree), and figuring out how to help him get over it will be one of the biggest gifts you can give your dog (and you) — and it will last their entire life. Another thing to be prepared for is the developmental fears your puppy will experience as he grows up. These are normal stages in a puppy's life that usually happen at around 8-11 weeks and again around 6-14 months. These are periods where your dog is seeing the world in a new way and figuring out what is and isn't dangerous. It is also a time when life-long phobias or triggers can be created. It's important to know how to recognize and respond to the behaviors your dog has during these periods to keep him calm and balanced (but not coddled, either). Read everything you can find on the critical developmental stages of your puppy's life so you can be ready for how to respond and to know what social situations are and aren't helpful for your dog during these times.

Differences in Training Styles


Everyone in the family needs to know what the rules are and agree to enforce them in order to have a happy home and a happy puppy. Getting the whole family on the same page with training is perhaps the biggest challenge your household will face. Every member of the household needs to “be on the same page” and follow the same rules and routines with a puppy. The only way dogs really learn rules is through consistency. It is easy for a puppy to never quite get the training down when he is treated differently by each family member. For example, if the rule is no feeding from the table, or no getting up on furniture, everyone has to abide by it. The hard part is keeping up the rules when your new puppy is just so darn cute and really wants a nibble from the dinner plate, or really wants to come sit on someone's lap. Big problems start small, and that includes allowing a little leeway here and there on rules as the puppy is learning the ropes. Once you give in - just once - to something puppy wants (but heretofore was against house rules), to puppy this becomes The Way Things Are. It is also a challenge to get everyone on board with consistent ways of training. Having the same words or signals for commands helps a puppy to understand what is being asked of him, yet making sure everyone in the household provides those same words or signals when asking for something is a bigger challenge than you might expect. When you know what you're in for, when you are able and willing to accept the challenges, and when you plan in advance before puppy comes home, you and your puppy will both have a much easier, most joyful time together!

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DNA Test for Coat Color


Testing for coat color and a D-locus test for color dilution have recently become available and our poodles’ tests all show the DD allele. The coat color test allows breeders to fairly accurately predict the colors of puppies that will be produced with each breeding. As for the D-locus test for fading, it was originally held that if both parents carried the DD allele their pups would not fade. Unfortunately, even in those with DD alleles, it appears that there are other genes at work particularly in red or apricot poodles that causes most to fade. Until these elusive genes are identified, the D-locus test in red poodles is unable to predict whether or not your puppy’s coat will fade. Therefore, when a breeder states that his/her red poodles are non-fading, this information should be viewed as opinion rather than fact!
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All puppies are first sold as pet quality on a CKC NON BREEDING CONTRACT. Although the breeder does their best to place the appropriate puppies into appropriate homes (i.e show puppy), all puppies are sold as PET QUALITY ONLY for the regular selling price of PET QUALITY puppies.


Should any of these terms be broken, breeder reserves the right to confiscate the dog and any puppies produced, and there will be a $10,000 fine. Buyer is responsible for all fees associated with breeding and titling this dog.

Should any terms and conditions of this non breeding agreement be breached, the Breeder Joellen Curtis, of Isle of Standard Poodles, reserves the right to sieze the above named dog and any puppies produced by the above named dog. Breach of Non Breeeding Contract, will result in a file of claim against the offending party, in the amount of $25,000. This claim will be filed against the offending party and the associated parties. This could result in a claim against your property.


“THE FIRST 48 HOURS”

Finally when it is time to bring your new puppy home.
Here are a few preparations that you need to go through to get ready for that new baby.
Create a safe, friendly environment. Here is a checklist:

1- Make sure that all poisonous items are stored out of puppies reach.
2- Remove any poisonous plants.
3- Look at your home from your new puppies point of view and remove hazardous items.
There are things that your new puppy will need so I would suggest purchasing them in advance if possible;
1- Food and Water dishes, sometimes well water can give them runs since our water is fluoride free clean good water even spring is
best. I personally have an electric water dish out side all year round.
2- A collar , I personally like the martin-gale collars, and a leash and even an extended leash can be a great training leash. ( I WILL BE GIVING YOU A MARTINGALE COLLAR AND LEASH!
3- A pin brush for fluffing, called a slicker and a nice comb. Brushes are great for surface brushing but you really need a comb for
getting the mats out and getting down to the skin.
4- Safe and appropriate toys. Nothing from China!!
Usually if a toy and fit comfortable in a puppies mouth it is too small and the puppy may choke on it.
5- A bed or crate for sleeping in.
6- A baby gate to keep puppy from going where you don't want him to go. Don't worry about them falling down the stairs they will go up
and down in no time!
7- News paper Your puppy has been trained on this from 5 weeks of age. They make potty training much easier on your puppy.
8- I buy hanging bells that fit on your door handle from pet smart they quickly can be taught to ring THE BELLS when wanting out side.

Puppies have different nutritional needs than an adult dog. By feeding a complete and balanced nutritional food you can help maintain healthy teeth, bones, weight, and help keep your dog healthy for a long time to come.
Consistency is the key. Feed you puppy the same food at the same time every day.
Puppies should be fed 3-4 times a day.
I don't think it's possible to over feed a poodle! They are grazers and I've never seen a fat poodle unless she is expecting puppies! Too much weight can cause liver and heart problems as well as joint and back problems.
Don't be upset if your puppies appetite changes. Occasional loss of appetite or digestive upset is normal for growing puppies.
Continue your feeding routine. However, should the upset become severe or last for more than a day contact me or your vet. Pure pumpkin or sweet potato can firm up stools.
Making the transition easy:

1- Decide on a name and use it all the time. REMEMBER NEVER CALL A PUPPY BY HIS OR HER NAME WHEN CORRECTING ONLY FOR THE PUPPY TO COME!
2- Keep your puppy with you at all times. this will keep him out of trouble.
3- Let sleeping puppies lie. They need their rest as much as you do!
4- Teach young children the proper way to hold and care for the puppy.
5- Don't leave your puppy unattended with young children or other pets until everyone has adjusted well.

House training:
1- Establish a routine and STICK WITH IT!!!!! Take your puppy out after eating and sleeping.
2- Until the puppy is completely trained keep and eye on him!
3- Crate-training is essential!
4- Designate a certain potty area and stick with it!
5- Correct the puppies mistakes only when you catch him in the act. otherwise the puppy will not understand why you are angry with him/HER.

PUPPY PROOFING YOUR HOME!
Puppies are like babies, they are always curious, and they are teething. Since puppies
have a low vantage point and can see things that you can’t, it is important to get down on their level when puppy proofing your home.

Here are some suggestions:

1-Confine puppy in a safe area that they can’t escape from.
2- Don’t leave your puppy unsupervised.
3- Keep your puppy off high decks and balconies where he may fall.
4- Store cleaning supplies, soaps, chemicals, poisons, and antifreeze securely out of reach.
5- Remove poisonous houseplants. (See list of poisonous house plants below)
6- Keep the toilet lid down.
7- Remove or cover any electrical cords or outlets.
8- Keep medications out of reach.
9- Make sure you know where your puppy is before closing any doors or leaving the house.
10- Keep sewing supplies, hardware, and coins out of reach.
11- Keep plastic six-pack beverage holders and plastic bags, elastics out of reach.
12- Always have important phone numbers like your vet handy and mine on hand!

Joellen Curtis 519-452-7021 cell 519-615-5691